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Hot day in the woods

Hot day in the woods

A nice, leisurely stroll around the woods this afternoon as it was just under 90F. I put the dogs in the stream at every opportunity, so I think they had fun 🙂

I used my Sony A7iii with a Canon lens to take some pictures at this morning’s service, but I am still loving my little Fuji X100F (that all these were taken with)- it’s so nice to have a really great camera that I can just grab and go with for things like dog walks 🙂

Ouch!

Ouch!

Crisp slipped on a wet rock in the woods and went straight into a tree!

It looks worse than it is: scraped knees and broken glasses and maybe a black eye, but I think his pride is what really took the hit 😏

Fun with trucks

Fun with trucks

As part of our summer cleanup we have to finally get rid of a whole bunch of chemicals, old gas cans, ACs and a couple of fridges that we have been stockpiling from our various closet cleanups etc. over the last couple of years.

You can’t put this kind of stuff in a dumpster or out for bulk, so I have rented a truck to haul it all to the Household Material Recovery Facility in Valhalla, I have a noon appointment to drop it all off with them 🙂

Staff get-together :)

Staff get-together :)

A huge thank you to Kate and Bruce for hosting a wonderful staff, partners, and dogs get together at the Rectory this evening! Fantastic food and company (amazing ribs and strawberry shortcake!)- I think all the dogs will sleep well tonight!

The London Times obit

The London Times obit

It’s taken them a while, but the Times has published a very nice obit of Dad.
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/stephen-thorne-obituary-j2700tmrv
They have a paywall, so here’s the full text without needing to subscribe …

OBITUARY

Stephen Thorne obituary

Tall, melodious-voiced actor who played a trio of Doctor Who villains but was best known for his hundreds of audiobooks

July 3 2019, 12:01am, The Times

Making stories bigger: Thorne in 1983
Making stories bigger: Thorne in 1983REX FEATURES

From the voice of Aslan in radio and television adaptations of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe to a trio of villains in Doctor Who, Stephen Thorne was the ideal choice of actor when a deep, melodious tone was needed, making almost any story seem bigger and better than it had appeared on paper.

Thorne was known to listeners of BBC Radio 4 from programmes such as Book at Bedtime and Poetry Please, while aficionados of talking books could enjoy his well-rounded vowels in works by Hardy, Dickens and Churchill. His 1986 audiobook recording of The Sheep-Pig by Dick King-Smith was a classic of the genre, with Gramophone magazine declaring him to be “one of the best readers in the profession”.

His first appearance in Doctor Who came in 1971 as Azal, the last living daemon on Earth, in The Daemons (season eight) with Jon Pertwee. He returned as Omega, the renegade time lord in The Three Doctors (season ten; 1972-73) and in 1976 he was Eldrad, last of the Kastrians, in The Hand of Fear (season 14). Thorne’s height, 6ft 5in, undoubtedly came in useful. In all three roles he was hidden either by make-up or under a mask. He recalled taking care not to overplay his part. “You tend when playing a monster to shriek and shout,” he explained, gesticulating wildly. “But the mask does half the work for you.”

In contrast, Thorne himself was a kind and gentle giant. He enjoyed the Doctor Who legacy and would take part in conventions around the world. He often recalled how Omega’s mask meant that he could barely see the lead actors, notably Pertwee, who would regularly move him out of the shot. On the third occasion Patrick Troughton intervened to tell Pertwee: “It’s not you they want to see, it’s the monster.”

Stephen John Thorne was born in London in 1935 and adopted at an early age by the Rev Alan Thorne, a clergyman, and his wife Betty (née Boulton), who raised him in Hesketh Bank, Lancashire, where young Stephen showed his aptitude for acting by climbing into the church pulpit to imitate his father’s sermons. He was educated at Liverpool College and did his National Service with the Royal Navy on HMS Ocean, where his acting skills so impressed the chief petty officer that he was advised to try for a career on the stage.

On demobilisation he auditioned successfully for the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (Rada). There he met Barbara Sykes, who became a director and stage manager, and they were married in 1958. Barbara, who left the theatre and worked as a teacher, survives him with their sons Simon, who works in mental health, and Crispian, who is a verger at a church in New York state. He also had six grandchildren.

He went from Rada to Stratford, where he recalled a heavy drinking and smoking culture. He would tell how Peter O’Toole would arrive in the wings with a cigarette in one hand and half a bottle of whisky in the other. On one occasion Thorne was holding a noisy party at his rented cottage, which was interrupted by two policemen who had been summoned by an irate neighbour. O’Toole was sent to speak to the officers and ten minutes later “Peter had a bottle of Scotch and three glasses and the policemen were sitting down drinking and laughing with him”.

Thorne joined the Mermaid Theatre in London in 1961, working for the autocratic Bernard Miles, notably in The Andersonville Trial, based on an incident in the American civil war, and ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore. His next stop was the Bristol Old Vic, but soon he had joined the BBC’s drama repertory company.

Doctor Who was not Thorne’s only venture on to the small screen: he was also seen in Z Cars (1971), Crossroads (1978-79) and David Copperfield (1986). His last appearance was in an episode of Last of the Summer Wine (2006). However, he would point out that radio required different skills from film or television work. “Radio acting needs a lot more energy in the voice,” he said. “If you just do it naturalistically it sounds dreadful and flat.”

He was a member of the Garrick Club, a staunch Labour supporter and a firm member of the Church of England. On one occasion he acquired a labradoodle rescue dog called Chelsea, but insisted on changing her name to Jenna “because I’m not walking round north London calling out the name of a football team I do not support”.

Stephen Thorne, actor, was born on March 2, 1935. He died from cancer on May 26, 2019, aged 84

A re-post …

A re-post …

My Dad was incredibly proud of this post I made last 4th of July, so I’m re-posting it today. Partly because I miss him, and partly because, with concentration camps at the borders and tanks in DC, it is just as true and even more relevant a year later.

In case of rain …

In case of rain …

We are having our Sunday services outside again this summer, but we need to be ready to move inside if the weather doesn’t co-operate: so I spent a happy couple of hours this morning rearranging the chancel to try and create a slightly more informal and intimate space for summer worship-

I hope we don’t have to use it, but if we do I think it’ll feel nicely familiar but relaxed 🙂

The dogs they had a party …

The dogs they had a party …

Surprisingly enough the dogs behaved really well the other day, so here is the original picture we got, no Photoshop needed …

Then we had to do another quick photo session today with one of the dogs who couldn’t make it, add her in, remove leashes etc., and add a slightly pissed off looking Sasha in the window 🙂

I think it all worked rather well!

Last one today …

Last one today …

Not the new camera this time- I decided to give the drone an outing as it was such a nice evening and took a shot of the new sail in the colombarium 🙂

A little street

A little street

I had to take my old Civic in for an inspection and an oil change today, which took about an hour. So I used the time for a little street photography around Port Chester…

My new Fuji X100F is awesome for this kind of thing- it’s much less intimidating and so much more discreet- and the Acros B&W film simulation is awesome! These are all straight out of the camera with no editing at all.